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Happy , everyone!

I am not sure if I will be able to do a photo every day, but I'll try.

Here's an opilionid in goldenrod, found in Trinity-Bellwoods. 🐦

2: I've noticed a kind of mite renaissance in the fall—nature giving a last hurrah I guess. Whirligig mites (family Anystidae) are once again easy to find. This little one is eating something held in its pedipalps.

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3: on a cup plant stem in Trinity-Bellwoods, a red velvet mite (family Trombidiidae) eating…oh dear…another, smaller trombidiid.

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4: a classic, the cross orbweaver (Araneus diadematus). Spotted on the one big willow by the Budapest Park washrooms, which is normally monopolized by Larinioides and Zygiella.

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5: a pseudoscorpion from under a rock in my yard! These minute arachnids are found everywhere in the world, but are rarely seen because of their size and their hidden habitats (soil, leaf litter, under bark and rocks). 🐦

6: mesostigmatid mites found under a rock at Sunnyside. Probably free-living soil predators like many mesostigs.

Araneae, Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones, Acariformes, Parasitiformes—I think that's all the arachnid orders found in my area.

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7: I can spot an anystid butt at 50 paces.

Seen in Trinity-Bellwoods. 🐦

8: one of my favourite observations this year, mating _Pardosa lapidicina_ at Trillium Park! I've watched countless courtships but had never seen this species mating until now.

Taken in June. 🐦

9: six-spotted orbweaver (_Araniella displicata_) attempting to balloon, and a closer look at it. Under a certain size, many spiders can fly using silk released in the wind.

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10: an absolutely tiny Eustala orbweaver next to a largish Bryobia clover mite. (The mite's body is probably 0.5-0.75 mm long; the largest clover mites aren't even 1mm I think.)

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Oh shit it's !! Have a bonus entry: the _Synemosyna formica_ ant-mimic jumping spider I was lucky to find recently.

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11: just a cute little zebra jumping spider (_Salticus scenicus_). Found back in April near the Marilyn Bell Park tennis courts.

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12: _Eustala_ and gold.

The new stone blocks they got for the Sunnyside shoreline have these lovely gold mineral inclusions—pyrite? Pleased to get one in a photo with this little orbweaver.

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13: Silly walk.

A long-legged velvet mite (family Erythraeidae) navigates a crevice in a rock down at Sunnyside. It raised and tapped its long front legs rapidly. 🐦

14: _Tutelina_ are small, flattened, iridescent jumping spiders I typically find on tree trunks. Some species are very shiny and showy, but the ones I've found here are a more subtle but still lovely oil-sheen grey.

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15: a tiny _Larinioides_ orbweaver nestled into a slight indent in a rock. These are by far the most common orbweaver in my neighbourhood.

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16: a wolf spider sunbathing at the Ontario Place shoreline one sun-drenched summer afternoon.

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17: one of the larger sheet-web weavers (family Linyphiidae) at ~0.5-10 mm body length, hanging upside-down in her delicate web at the beach at Ontario Place.

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18: an orbweaver (_Araneus diadematus_ by the ventral markings, I think?—couldn't see the other side) touching up her web. Check out the clawed back foot drawing silk out of the spinnerets!

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19: from May, a plump clover mite feeding on a blade of grass, leaving those small white marks you see. Yes, <protester voice> THIS IS WHAT A CLOVER MITE LOOKS LIKE

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@nev that iridescence might be reflection from tiny hairs! i often see this with wasps, all of whom are fluffy to some degree. paper wasps in particular, with their extremely fine and translucent hairs, often give back this same kind of almost metallic sheen, especially if i don't use diffusers on my flash heads

@nev wow! fantastic find. I wonder how many "ants" out there I've seen have actually been spiders.

@clayton some of them, for sure! Their disguise will foil a cursory glance…and that's all they need.

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